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Eye to Eye Blog

Read the latest articles that Dr. Jeff Miller has written for his column, “Eye to Eye” published in the Stillwater Newspress.

Part III: Can We Cure Nearsightedness?

In part two of “Can We Cure Nearsightedness” we went over ways to control the progression of nearsightedness by spending more time outdoors and getting more exposure to daylight, as well as, reducing the amount a patient accommodates or focuses by practicing a safe Harmon distance. As a reminder, the...

Part II: Can We Cure Nearsightedness?

In part one of “Can We Cure Nearsightedness” we discussed myopia, its incidence and the expected increase over the next 30 years. Currently there are a number of clinical approaches to preventing or slowing the progression of nearsightedness. These approaches include spending more time outdoors, reducing the focusing demand on...

Part I: Can We Cure Nearsightedness?

Nearsightedness, or myopia, is a visual condition in which patients cannot see clearly in the distance however, can see clearly at near.  The level of vision a person has at distance or near varies depending on if the patient has mild, moderate, severe, or extreme myopia.  A mildly myopic person...

Nyctalopia (Night Blindness)

Night blindness, also called nyctalopia (nik-tl-oh-pee-uh), is the inability to see well at night or in poor light.  It was first described over 2000 years ago.  Nyctalopia is not a disease, but rather a symptom of many different conditions, some treatable, some not.  Historically, it was known as “moonblink” and...

Include Pre-K Children in Back to School Eye Exams

Children with uncorrected vision conditions or eye health problems face many barriers in life.  These barriers can occur academically, socially and athletically.  Comprehensive vision and eye health evaluations at an early age can break down these barriers and help enable your children to reach their highest potential. Vision doesn’t just...

Why Your Child Needs an Eye Exam

As the first semester of 2014-2015 school year comes to an end, parents are hopeful their children are meeting and exceeding the minimum standards to excel in school.  Most have had a parent-teacher conference and have asked this question.  It is important from a parent’s perspective to know that reading...

Retinal Detachment: How would you know?

I got a floater a couple of months ago, which I ignored because I’ve had many. I also then got a flashing in my right eye. I was due into the eye doctor and was going to mention this, having no idea this was important……… About three weeks ago, I...

Sports Eye Injuries

According to the National Society to Prevent Blindness, almost 40,000 eye injuries a year are reported to be related to sports and recreational products.  This number only reflects those that were reported, and estimates have been as high as 100,000 injuries a year.  The sad part about eye injuries is...

The Hazards of Looking Good

Magazines, newspapers and TV smother us with images of the ideal look.  In fact, the average American woman spends 12K a year to look good!  This figure may seem high however, consider what you spend a year on all beauty and grooming products, hair and nail appointments, and of course...

The History of Cataract Surgery

Cataracts have been a medical problem throughout history.  In early times, strange concoctions and eye drops were used to treat cataracts until physicians in ancient Babylon and India began surgical treatment.  Their highly primitive method, known as couching, involved using a sharp instrument to push the cloudy cataract lens to...

Back to School Eye Exams

Vision screenings are an important service provided by most schools and without question provide benefits.  It is important to recognize however, that studies have demonstrated screenings are not as effective as comprehensive eye exams.  In fact, The National Institutes of Health found that school screenings catch only 37% of children...

Vision Problems in Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson’s disease is a progressive neurological condition that was first described in 1817 by Dr. James Parkinson. The London doctor first reported the symptoms calling the condition the “shaking palsy”. It is mostly characterized by problems with body movements referred to as “motor symptoms”.  The most identifiable motor symptom is...

Are School Vision Screenings Enough?

Vision screening programs were designed to help identify children who have eye or vision problems that could impair their ability to develop and learn normally. Visual clues are key to how children learn and function.  Vision problems that go uncorrected can affect all aspects of a child’s growth including their...

What is Ocular Hypertension?

Ocular hypertension is a term used to describe an increase in eye pressure that is above the normal healthy range.  Normal healthy eye pressure typically ranges from 10-21.   Patients diagnosed as “ocular hypertensives” have eye pressure over 21 however, have no detectable changes in vision or damage to the structure...